The ironies of life

When I was a teen, I wanted to be different. I shouldn’t have worried; each person is unique. It took me a long time to figure that out.

I went to college at age seventeen, and when I chose a major, I went over my favorite subjects, crossing out a few, and ending up with my number one interest: art. To be different, I chose “straight art” and not “art education.” I’ll explain.

Everyone in my whole family is a teacher. College chemistry, middle school math, physical education, first grade, kindergarten, grade school and middle school. Every one of them is or has taught.

So, I wouldn’t.

That’s what I thought.

No one had “art” as a profession, so I went with that one. Practical, right? How ignorant I was.

It was a fitting major for me. I minored in psychology and then changed to English—so I could graduate on time and marry my fiancé. By the way, both of those were great decisions, .

My first job after college didn’t last long. It was physically draining, and I needed something different. I found a job in art and then another, and I taught—don’t laugh—calligraphy at a local community college.

Then, my husband and I started deputation for missions in Spain.

I left my full-time job several months into deputation, when our circles around our home got too big to be back on Monday mornings.

We had a child before we moved to Spain and one after we got here, and soon, I became a homeschooling mom. You may laugh, now.

Sixteen years later and having learned grade school and high school all over again—twice—I decided that the empty nest was a great opportunity to catch up on all the things I hadn’t done while schooling the children. My life quickly filled, and then, all of a sudden, I was left with lots of free time on my hands.

I saw an ad for teaching Spanish online, talked to my husband, and applied. After an interview, I was hired, and for the last four years, I’ve been teaching homeschooling high schoolers in a virtual classroom and loving every minute.

The old saying, “what goes around comes around” is true. The girl who didn’t want to teach—ha ha—ended up teaching for twenty-three years and enjoying it.

That’s not all.

I wrote my first book, a handbook for women—the result of about fifteen years of Bible study—and published it in 2012. It’s titled His Ways, Your Walk and is available through me.

My first blog post ever was published in January 2012. (You may access and browse “In the Way” here.) I bought a personal domain, starting this new blog in January 2019.

My first novel is a work in progress. It’s been written and revised many times—and totally being rewritten at the moment. Oh, to learn today’s style and forget the old ways! But I digress.

My father was a teacher like everyone else, but almost of his life, he’s been a writer.

As it turns out, the two things I never thought I’d be are what I am.

And, I am richer for them.

The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun. Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? it hath been already of old time, which was before us (Ecclesiastes 1:9-10).

Live joyfully … for that is thy portion in this life, and in thy labour which thou takest under the sun. Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might (Ecclesiastes 9:9-10a).

Has your life turned out differently than you imagined?  How? Please feel free to share your story.

2 Replies to “The ironies of life”

  1. I was a Home Economics Education major, but by my senior year knew I didn’t want to teach. I spent several years feeling I had failed in seeking and finding God’s call. But after a while I realized that God still used what I was taught then, even if I never taught Home Ec. in a classroom. Plus, not coming from a Christian home, the classes in family and children laid a great foundation for me.

    I think part of my difficulty arose from the fact that there was such an emphasis on full-time Christian service in my teens and college years instead of an emphasis that everyone is in full time Christian service no matter what their occupation is. Young people who really wanted to go all out for God felt the only way to do so was to go into official ministry. There were even girls in our church who only wanted to date “preacher boys” — as if everyone else was second class, somehow.

    1. Thank you for sharing. It is true. The concept of being a Christian might have been taught with a faulty emphasis. I felt that way, too. I am so thankful for you, for your home, and for your sons. The Lord has used every bit of that training to help you make that lovely nest for your family.

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