Women of the Bible 15: Who are we?

We are four sisters with a unique ministry.

Our father is an evangelist.

In the New Testament, the only other woman with our title is the ancient lady, Anna. We are young, unmarried women with the same spiritual gift.

Some people think we’re lady preachers. Ha ha! We think that’s funny. Scripture never approves of women leading men or teaching them.

But, we do preach, if you want to call it preaching. We share Scripture with other women and also evangelize children. We are our father’s right arms, so to speak. When he preaches to adults, we later counsel some of the women using Bible truths.

We also teach children the gospel. The message of salvation through Jesus is so simple that even little children can understand and be saved. In fact, Jesus said, Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein (Mark 10:15).

After us, though women in Titus 2 and other passages clearly teach, there are no more women in the New Testament called by this title.

Who are we?

Who is our father?

What is our title?

And, for extra credit, what Bible verse tells us not to teach men in church?

For special bonus points, three verses in the Bible tell women to do one specific action in church services. What is that action? Do you know the references?

Women of the Bible 12: Who are we?

We’re only mentioned once in the Bible, but what it says about us is important: we “labor in the Lord.” Currently, we serve in the church in Rome.

Some think we’re twins. We are surely sisters. Since the Bible doesn’t reveal our identity and we don’t appear in other sources, history will only surmise. Our names indicate we were brought up “delicately,” which might indicate nobility. Some even think we’re in Ceasar’s household.

Whoever we are, we’re famous throughout the centuries for one thing: being active in our local church. Laboring—working hard—for the Lord.

And, this positive testimony is the legacy we would desire.

A few years after we’re mentioned in the Epistle of Paul to the Romans, he would write: That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness; Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son: In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins (Colossians 1:10-14).

We are thankful for God’s redemption in our lives—two gentile sisters, able to serve God thanks to His power in us.

Who are we?

Where in Romans are we mentioned?

Image thanks to: www.LumoProject.com.

Women of the Bible 3: Who are we?

My grandfather was Hepher, the son of Gilead, of the family of Manasseh. My father had no sons, but I have plenty of sisters. I think my parents must have been hard up for girls’ names, since all of us got –ah at the end. I am Noah. Can you believe it? Just like the guy who built the ark and saved his family and the animals. My sisters’ names are even worse. But I’m being foolish.

My father was faithful to God, but Jehovah only gave him daughters.

When our father passed away, my sisters and I were single women. We had no brother to take care of us. Our father’s wealth would pass to no one if we couldn’t inherit. So, all five of us got our heads together and came upon a plan. It was bold, but we figured it never hurt to ask. The result would determine if we’d be destitute and the community would need to help us, or we would be able to inherit, just as if we were sons.

We presented ourselves to the leader, the priest, princes, and the congregation by the door of the tabernacle. My eldest sister spoke, “Our father died in the wilderness, and he was not in the company of them that gathered themselves together against the LORD in the company of Korah; but died in his own sin, and had no sons. Why should the name of our father be done away from among his family, because he hath no son? Give unto us therefore a possession among the brethren of our father.”

The leader turned his back on us and walked away. We later found out he’d taken our cause before the Lord.

After a half hour, he returned and told everyone that God had spoken to him, saying, “The daughters … speak right: thou shalt surely give them a possession of an inheritance among their father’s brethren; and thou shalt cause the inheritance of their father to pass unto them. And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a man die, and have no son, then ye shall cause his inheritance to pass unto his daughter.”

This ruling became a precedent. God said women could inherit if there were no brothers.

God said something else to our leader: we could only marry within our tribe. If we did not, we wouldn’t keep our inheritance. All of us ended up marrying our father’s brothers’ sons. Thus, we kept our wealth in the tribe of Manasseh.

Through my sisters and me, God showed the generations to come that He is fair and loving, and that He takes care of women left fatherless.

I am thankful for an older sister who was brave enough to speak up; for our leader, who went to God with our petition; and most of all, to God, for pleading our case—and providing for the rights of many young women which would follow.

Praise Jehovah, for He is good.

Who are we? You already know my name. Who are my sisters? And, who was our father?