Bible women 7: Who am I?

The judge profesied to the captain of Israel: The journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall deliver your enemy into the hand of a woman.

The enemy gathered his troops with nine hundred chariots of iron and readied them for battle.

Israel went to meet them, descending from Mount Tabor with ten thousand men.

The Lord confused the enemy with all their chariots and warriors, and their captain ran away on foot.

I was outside tending to our camels when I noticed him running towards our tent home. As soon as his face was recognizable, I knew who he was: our enemy, the captain of Jabin’s army, running away like the coward he was, wearing the cloak of a poor man. I circled to the front and called out to him, “Stranger, please come in and find shelter.” When he entered, I rolled out a cushioned mat on the floor.

“I’m thirsty. Bring me water,” he commanded. I knew by his tone I had guessed correctly. This was indeed the captain.

Instead of water, I opened a bottle and gave him milk, encouraging him to take a nap. I would stand watch at the door. He ordered me to lie and say no, should anyone ask if I had seen him.

Oh yes, I would stand watch. I would make sure no one came in, but I wouldn’t lie. I’d guarantee he wouldn’t be seen—and there would be no witness to what I was about to do.

Within minutes, he was asleep on the couch on the floor. Snoring. What a racket! My husband never snored so loud. I knew my chance had come. I tiptoed outside to the wooden chest where we kept tools, chose a sharp tent stake and hammer, and silently slinked back into my tent. It wouldn’t have mattered if I’d made a noise. That man wouldn’t even have heard a camel bawling. He was sound asleep and still making too much noise of his own.

I steadied myself, took a deep breath and held it. I would save many lives by killing him. Still, it wasn’t easy. I had to muster all my strength. I held the tent stake at his temple and hit it hard. With two terrible blows, it went all the way through, pinning him in place.

He would never snore again.

While I pounded and blood splattered all over my dress and the corner of our tent, Israel’s soldiers followed the confused enemy and defeated them. Many enemy troops fell on their swords rather than being killed or captured. They suffered utter defeat.

Soon, Israel’s captain and soldiers passed by my home. Still decorated with blood spray, I invited the captain to come inside to view his enemy. The tent peg pinned his head to our floor.

God had delivered the kingdom of Jabin into the hands of the Israelites. Our people were free.

Later, they would sing praises to God for the victory. Part of that song described my little part. Blessed above women shall (she) be, blessed shall she be above women in the tent. She put her hand to the nail, and her right hand to the workmen’s hammer; and with the hammer she smote (the captain), she smote off his head, when she had pierced and stricken through his temples. At her feet he bowed, he fell, he lay down: at her feet he bowed, he fell: where he bowed, there he fell down dead.

Who am I?

And, who was the enemy captain I killed?

What was the name of the captain of Israel’s army?

And, for extra credit, who was the judge?

And, if you enjoy deep topics, what is the difference between killing in war and murder? Is there a difference? Bible references?