Fiction Review: Grace Like A River Flows

Grace Like A River Flows is the first book I’ve read by R. Marshall Wright. I look forward to reading more.

Billy Maddox is the proverbial “meaner than a junkyard dog” kind of person. He beats his girlfriend, abuses liquor, and leaves his trash around his badly kept home.

Glencoe is a nice little town, but the Oaks—where Billy lives—is across the tracks and another story entirely. Not even the police like going there.

Brad and his dog Beasley find out Billy is beating Heather, and Brad decides to do something about it. His methods may not be acceptable to the law but they’re effective, and the sheriff doesn’t mind a little bit of help. Brad becomes the conscience of those who act like Billy, and there are several in this town who need his special voice to their consciences.

Reagan Lamb is the pastor at Glencoe Community Church. He has a big heart and an excellent grasp of the gospel. He knows Jesus can transform lives and wants his congregation to get a taste of revival. Reagan’s one vice—if you can call it that—is driving his 1991 Miata sportscar … fast. He has a good marriage and a solid home. If only his church could get a vision for its community.

He answers the call to go and see Heather in the hospital. He can hardly recognize her, since her face is bruised and swollen.

Brad goes to work with his unique brand of “angelic” persuasion, and Pastor Reagan gets busy, too. The Oaks might never be the same.

I absolutely loved this book. For one thing, it has heart—a gospel-centered heart. It is also fast-paced and story-driven.

The writing is not without a few grammar and spelling mistakes, and it uses some crude words (no cursing). Also, there’s some violence, and there are references to bodily functions. But, this is one of the few books I have read where those flaws and my personal preferences didn’t disturb my great enjoyment. Maybe it’s the substance over style thing, but maybe it’s just that it’s a great read, period.

I wish Mr. Wright would have gotten this book professionally edited, but truthfully, it’s charming as it is. His pastor’s heart and down-to-earth style, coupled with his military background, make this a good read for any Christian.

Mr. Wright has written at least two more books. I look forward to reading them.

Five stars for sure.