Fiction Review: Above the Fog

Above the Fog, by Karen Lynn Nolan begins with this heart-wrenching prayer from twelve-year-old Coreen: “If there really is a God then let the roof of the mine collapse on Daddy today and send him to hell, where he belongs.”

Coreen and her family live in a coal-mining town down a holler in Kentucky. It’s typical of many coal towns—dirt poor. Or, maybe we should say mud poor. The novel begins with a storm followed by a flood and great danger to all the people in the valley.

Coreen and her mother help Grandma and Coreen’s dog, Patches, climb the hill and escape the flood. Everything they owned, which wasn’t much, was left behind in their ramshackle houses.

Coreen’s mom usually escapes in a different way: into novels. She doesn’t have a life outside of them. As the river rises, she realizes with both worry and relief that her husband hasn’t come home.

Several days later, Coreen’s father is found dead—and not a soul is sorry.

Follow Coreen, her mom, and the townspeople as they find out how her father died and what he, her mother, and many others had hidden for years. Follow Coreen and her mother as they discover the truth, which helps them both rise Above the Fog.

This is a great story, real and hard, lightened with some happy moments and giving people. I loved it.

Because of thematic elements, Above the Fog is for older teens and adults, not children. There is no cursing, and sordid details are not elaborated.

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