Who am I?

I’m a woman from the Bible. Who am I?

One evening, I arrive at the well as is my custom, and an elderly man is sitting there. I can’t figure out why any man would be waiting in that place. Maybe he is unwell. I ask him if he wants some water. He gratefully takes a dipperful. The old man seems tired but also excited, as if he were anticipating something special. I’m not sure what to think.

I volunteer to give his camels water, and he accepts. I lift many pitchers full. The man is appreciative and emotional. He bows his head and worships the LORD. Blessed be the LORD God of my master, who hath not left destitute my master of his mercy and his truth: I being in the way, the LORD led me to the house of my master’s brethren.

He gives me beautiful jewelry, which I wear immediately. In turn, I offer hospitality to him and his animals.

My brother greets the stranger warmly. The man refuses to eat without first telling the story of his mission. Frankly, it’s a long one. He goes back to the history behind his master and that he’d been sent to the relatives to pick out a wife for his master’s son. He tells my family about his prayer and my appearing and giving the camels water.

It seems strange to me that he would pray that way, and I honestly think most young women would treat animals well. What do I know?

My brother and father listen. Indeed, all the household listens intently to the fascinating story. When the man asks my father and brother if I will go with him to be his master’s son’s wife, they reply yes.

The man bows himself to the ground and worships God. Then, he gives me even more jewels of silver and gold and beautiful clothing. He also gives gifts to my brother and mother.

Everyone is in party mode tonight, eating and drinking and rejoicing.

I go to bed wondering what kind of man I will find at the end of my journey. Is he tall, kind … dare I dream handsome? It takes me a while to come to terms with my fate. In one day, I am engaged to marry someone I have never seen. Will he think I am pretty? Too late now. The agreement has been made. My father and brother are all for this match and I have no say. But, if the Lord indeed led this servant to me, it will be okay. I rest in the will of God and my family.

The next morning, the man is in a hurry to whisk me away. My mother and brother protest, saying they want me to stay at home at least ten days. But the man insists that we leave today.

My family lets me decide. I tell them I am willing.

I’m soon on my way, tears brimming as I turn away from home and family, promising to return someday. My nurse and maids travel with me, riding on camels, like princesses.

I peep from behind my veil to meet my husband. He is beautiful, and I sing a little song of praise to God in my heart.

Soon, we are married. He actually loves me. I didn’t dare to hope for my husband’s heart. It is wonderful to be married to this man. God knew what He was doing when he directed my father-in-law’s servant to me.

God blesses us with two sons, twins. The Lord tells me clearly, The elder shall serve the younger.

I make a huge mistake and decide our younger son is my favorite. I make another mistake, putting our son and his inheritance before my husband in my affections. Two deceptions later, I lose him forever. For he must flee, and I will die before he returns.

God has mercy on my favorite son and makes him—and our elder son—fathers of nations.

Who am I?

Who is my husband?

What are the names of our sons?

Which nations did they found?

For bragging rights, can you name my father and brother?

For extra credit, what specific kinds of jewelry did the servant give me at the well?

Women of the Bible 14: Who am I?

I married my brother.

Don’t judge me harshly.*

Let me tell you about my husband. He’s repentant now, but he wasn’t until after his punishment. Marked and banned from society by Almighty God, my husband reacted, “My punishment is greater than I can bear.” He was afraid our siblings and their children would want to kill him.

And, why not? After all, he had shed innocent blood in a fit of wrath. My husband is the eldest child—and the first murderer on the earth.

My God was merciful. “The LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth (my husband), vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the LORD set a mark upon (him), lest any finding him should kill him.”

So my husband moved his home to the land of Nod, on the eastern side of the Garden of Eden. There, we married, and I had our first child. My husband built a city and named it after our son. (Another man in the Bible would have the same name, and he was a great man, as well.)

But no one would name their son for my husband.

I am thankful for our merciful God, who gave a second chance to a murderer, forgave him, protected his life, and gave him a family. I praise God every day for prospering us. May God be praised.

Who am I?

Who is my husband?

Why do you think God had mercy upon this man instead of killing him outright?

My post surmises that he married his sister. The Bible doesn’t say. Do you think he married someone else? Feel free to share your ideas.

*Because Adam and Eve were commanded to populate the earth (Genesis 1), their children were not yet under the commands that prevented siblings and family members from marrying each other. Those did not come until hundreds of years later, in Leviticus 18:6-18.

Women of the Bible 13: Who am I?

I’m a woman who likes money and the things it can buy.

My husband and I are in the early church. I’m not sure I’d call myself a believer exactly, but we like the people and the atmosphere, and their dedication to God is impressive.

Hubby watches as Barnabas brings the whole price of land that he sold to the apostles as an offering. Of course, it was well received. At this time, there are a lot of Jesus followers in need and suffering persecution. Everyone chips in to help others. You can feed a lot of people with the price of Barnabas’ land.

So, my husband says to me, “We have an inheritance, too. Let’s do the same thing. We’ll be respected. And, we don’t have to tell that we keep back part of the money for ourselves. We’ll give the impression we’re giving the whole price.”

At once, I agree. It will be our secret. We’ll be able to live well while appearing sacrificial in the eyes of these Jesus followers. It’s a win-win.

That settled, my husband puts the property up for sale, and to our surprise, it sells fast to one of those Roman guys with silver to spare. We squirrel away our part, and my hubby takes the rest to Peter. “I sold a property, and here’s all the money. Use it for the poor.” (I was not there at the time. I found out three hours later that he’d presented the money.)

So, when I arrive later, would you believe—the nerve of him—the Apostle Peter questions me? “Tell me whether ye sold the land for so much?”

I answer, “Yea, for so much.”

Then Peter says to me, “How is it that ye have agreed together to tempt the Spirit of the Lord? Behold, the feet of them which have buried thy husband are at the door, and shall carry thee out.”

I lied. And, I died.

The young men came in, confirmed that I was dead, and carried me away and buried me beside my husband.

In my attempt to fool people and gain money, in three hours I lost wealth, my husband, and my own life. Peter said we lied to the Holy Spirit and that Satan filled our hearts. Looking back, I know that’s true.

As a result of God’s judgment on my husband and me, great fear came upon all the church, and upon as many as heard these things.

Who am I?

What was my husband’s name?

For bragging rights, in which book of the Bible can you find our tragic story?

Women of the Bible 12: Who are we?

We’re only mentioned once in the Bible, but what it says about us is important: we “labor in the Lord.” Currently, we serve in the church in Rome.

Some think we’re twins. We are surely sisters. Since the Bible doesn’t reveal our identity and we don’t appear in other sources, history will only surmise. Our names indicate we were brought up “delicately,” which might indicate nobility. Some even think we’re in Ceasar’s household.

Whoever we are, we’re famous throughout the centuries for one thing: being active in our local church. Laboring—working hard—for the Lord.

And, this positive testimony is the legacy we would desire.

A few years after we’re mentioned in the Epistle of Paul to the Romans, he would write: That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God; Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness; Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son: In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins (Colossians 1:10-14).

We are thankful for God’s redemption in our lives—two gentile sisters, able to serve God thanks to His power in us.

Who are we?

Where in Romans are we mentioned?

Image thanks to: www.LumoProject.com.

Women of the Bible 11: Who am I?

As a child, I was trafficked into slavery and purchased by a rich family. Away from parents, home, and country, I became a lady’s maid. At first, I cried and cried. I wanted my mommy and daddy.

After a few years, I could hardly remember what they looked like. I feel bad that I cannot even remember their faces. I am still a little girl and not yet a woman.

My mistress makes sure I do my work, but she also speaks kindly to me. I am thankful. I have heard stories.

When my master becomes ill, I am sad. Will I lose another father? Will my mistress always be depressed? Will I be sold?

I find it hard to sleep these nights.

This morning, I told my mistress, “Would God my lord were with the prophet that is in Samaria! For he would recover him of his leprosy.”

Word of my suggestion reaches the ears of the king, who writes a letter and sends ten talents of silver, six thousand pieces of gold, and ten changes of clothing to the king of Israel, along with my master and his servants.

When the king of Israel reads the letter, he is so disturbed that he tears his clothes and says, “Am I God?” He knows he cannot heal my master. The prophet of Israel hears about the king’s actions and sends a messenger to my master. He tells him what to do in order to be healed. But, my master is a proud and powerful man, and he is insulted. He thinks the prophet should have come in person and done some kind of a show while healing him.

My master scoffs.

His servants convince him to obey the prophet’s directions, and he finally does.

He looks down at his skin and notices it looks brand new. He is completely healed.

I am glad for him. My mistress is happy again. Both my master and mistress are beginning to believe in the power of my God.

I praise my God for answering my prayers.

Who am I?

Who is my master?

In which nation do I live?

For bragging rights, who was the king of that nation, the one who wrote the letter to the king of Israel?