Being a Child of the World

When people ask me where I’m from, I usually have to think three things:

1. Where I am at the moment

2. In which language the question is asked

3. What should I say?

The first part of my life story is similar to many. I was born in one place, moved to a few others, moved to a new state, moved to another state, moved back to my second state, got married and moved to yet another state, living in several different houses….

And that’s where the story changes completely. My husband, baby, and I moved to another country and became “foreigners.” We couldn’t even say “hi” when we arrived. In some senses, we went back to first grade—learning the alphabet, how to say simple phrases, the use of verbs, learning to count. We began the process of being strangers in a strange land.

Where am I from?

Birth—West Virginia

Growing up—Virginia, New Jersey, and Virginia

Married life—South Carolina and Spain

I’ve lived in Spain most of my life—eight years longer than in America.

So, where am I from?

Our children have it easy. They grew up in Spain.

My husband and I grew up in Spain, too—in a different sense. We’ve learned so much since we came: a new language, culture, lifestyle, and lots of history. We love it. What a fantastic place in which to live, work, and bring up our family.

So, we’ve lived in Spain more, yet our passport is from America, and our roots and families are across the ocean. We’ve been away so long that when we visit the States, we feel like foreigners, which we aren’t. We don’t here—but we are.

Where am I from?

I can’t tell you. The words don’t come.

Ask me, rather, about my life experiences, how God has proved Himself good through every day.

Ask me what I’ve learned.

Ask me how I think being an MK (missionary kid) profited our children.

Ask me hard questions.

I’m just a human being, a child of the world, a redeemed person with the calling to share my Redeemer with the rest of the world.

Yet, I’m not of this world. I am a pilgrim on this earth. And, I have the wonderful assurance that the world ahead of me is so much better than this one that I can’t even compare the two.

These (people named before) all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off, and were persuaded of them, and embraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth. For they that say such things declare plainly that they seek a country. And truly, if they had been mindful of that country from whence they came out, they might have had opportunity to have returned. But now they desire a better country, that is, an heavenly: wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city (Hebrews 11:13-16, emphasis mine).

Where are you from?

More importantly, where are you going?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *